Can You Be Converted Into A Licorice Lover?

A Danish luxury confectionary company is sending out free samples around the world to change haters' minds.

In the states the term "licorice" has become co-opted by brands like Twizzlers and Red Vines, but let us not forget that traditional licorice is far less fruity—and much more controversial. The flavor of black licorice is more akin to a chewable NyQuil treat and not quite as desirable as a makeshift candy straw. But that doesn't mean you can't grow to like it.

In an attempt to bring people over to the dark (licorice) side, Danish luxury confectionary company Lakrids by Bülow is offering up free licorice to everyone in the world. You read that right: the folks behind the brand are trying to get some of the sweet stuff into the hands of every. Single. Person. On. Earth. The #ShareItWithAHater campaign kicked off yesterday with a short film by Danish director Peter Harton giving a peek behind the scenes of the factory and offering some candid reactions to the product (one person spits it out, another calls the flavor "unique").

All you need to get your own sample is an email address and some patience. Anyone from anywhere can sign up for a sample at wemaketheworldlovelicorice.com, but as a small, one-machine operation, Lakrids by Bülow warns that they have no way of knowing when that sample might arrive. In fact, according to their outlandish calculations, it would take 412 years and 292 days to actually get a piece in the hands of every single person in the world, and even then, they predict there will still be some haters—16% of the population to be exact.

They are stacking the deck a little, choosing their chocolate-coated licorice as the sample of choice. The company's original licorice comes in four flavors (sweet, salty, red, and habanero) and it also seems to be experimenting with turning the root into powders, syrups, and liqueurs, all available to order online. But remember, there are lots of free samples to be fulfilled, so you may not get your alcoholic licorice until 2433.

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